Blog

A blog about blogging

Posted by Sandra on March 11, 2015  |   No Comments »

How to write a good blog post, I’m definitely not here to tell you, but I have a great interest in WHY some people are just that, good at writing a blog. The phenomenon of blogs is fascinating, the ability to capture someone’s attention, keep it and bring the reader back, not once a week but multiple times a day. A couple of years back I couldn’t understand why another person’s life could be so interesting that you kept on coming back to read about it.

That was until I started to read this one blog: blondinbella.se. Sweden’s and the Nordic countries largest blog, with more than 1 million unique readers a week (a ninth of the whole population) and because of its reach, every entry is translated to English. ‘Blondinbella’ is her acronym, but her name is Isabella Löwengrip Spångberg. She is 24 years old and she has had her blog for a decade.

Her work, and a lot of her income comes from advertising; which links to the industry that we are in. I think the skill for a blogger is to promote something (i.e. get paid for it) but without sounding like an ad. We watch TV, listen to radio etc and yes the ads do influence us but we don’t necessarily connect with them. But reading the blog and having someone saying ‘I used them, and this is what I think’ makes the influence 10 times stronger. Also, the beauty and ability for this particular blogger is that she can kindly use her readers to do market research. Having a million people to ask, without paying a penny for it is unbelievable.

Thanks to the blog and the income generated from it she has been able to start a lot of different companies. Clothing, jewellery, shoes, and most recently a cosmetics/beauty brand named after herself. I believe this is ‘IT’, once the blogging (if ever) was to stop, this company will keep her on her feet.

I love reading it, it’s very inspiring and also down to earth. You wouldn’t believe she is married and soon to be the mother of two as well. Reading her blog makes you want to aspire to the same standards. It is possible for everyone, as long as you want it enough!

25 years of Photoshop

Posted by sueb on February 18, 2015  |   No Comments »

On February 19, 1990, Adobe launched Photoshop 1. This week Photoshop celebrates its 25th birthday.

Where would we be without Photoshop?

Among all the productivity applications that have developed over the past 25 years, Adobe’s Photoshop has been the most influential and transformative for the rest of the world. It’s the greatest image manipulation program that’s ever been built, and like Google with search, its name has come to be used as a substitute for the actions it performs. Photoshop touch-ups are a compulsory part of most magazine and modelling shoots, but the application has grown into a fantastic tool for creating images from scratch as well.

This week marks the 25th anniversary of the first release of Photoshop. To commemorate the occasion, Adobe has compiled a minute-long animation made up of Photoshop creations. Featuring some familiar faces like Bilbo Baggins and Shrek, this compendium has been made up of the original working files provided by the artists themselves — and it features a bunch of great animations exposing the adjustments and layering that go into creating a realistic life like image.

In the 25 years and 15 major releases since Photoshop 1, Adobe’s photo editing software has evolved into an industry standard for design and photography pros alike. The application essentially took photo manipulation mainstream. It birthed new verbs like ‘shopped, and made bizarre masterpieces possible.

This is what Adobe Photoshop looked like 25 years ago and I can tell you from experience it was sooo hard to retouch back in the day on my Macintosh IISE!!!

For comparison’s sake, here’s what the latest version of Photoshop, “CC 2014,” looks like today:

And here is the promo video from Adobe to celebrate the 25 years

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Posted by sueb on November 13, 2014  |   No Comments »

The most important advertising event of the year that is a sports event, aka the Super Bowl

Posted by Andrea Riera on January 30, 2015  |   No Comments »

It’s just one day until the Super Bowl takes place again. Many big brands like Dove, Budweiser and Lexus have already released their ads online and another ad has already been pulled due to bad feedback received on the Internet. So with all the buzz going on at the moment about this ‘sport’ event, I feel like it’s time for me to talk about it.

Yes, I put quotes around ‘sport’ because if nobody had ever told me what the Super Bowl is and on the day of the event I had checked my Twitter account, I would have got the entirely wrong idea that it is more of an advertising contest (best, polemic or more expensive ad) than an sports event.

In fact, I feel quite embarrassed to admit I never know the teams that are playing. But I do know which brands have made a huge investment to get into millions of American (and also not American) houses. How could this not be an advertising contest if marketing magazines, blogs, agencies, newspapers…. are keeping track minute after minute of the Super Bowl?

I remember last year I was awake until late (it was actually 4am when I went to bed – the side effect of living in the other side of the sea) to be up to date on every single thing that happened during the event, always in terms of advertising (The scores of the match? Ask someone who cares). Yes, I lost sleep and, of course, I also spent my morning reading all the articles related to what I like to call ‘the day of the expensive TV ads’.

So after reading, watching and rewatching all the ads from last year, I can tell my winner was #UpForWhatever by Bud Light. It was basically an experiential marketing campaign made to become a viral advertisement that cost the brand a lot of money. I loved it. Yes, it is something that has been done before and yes, I reckon it can look like it is not actually improvised (the guy of the ad is simply great and I’m not sure everyone would react the same way in that situation) but I still like it.

To be honest, I am passionate about experiential campaigns, where the protagonists of the ads have no idea they are going to end up on Youtube being seen for thousands or millions of people.

The thing is that #UpForWhatever reminds me other viral advertising that made me have the bittersweet thought of “That’s amazing! Why the hell I can’t come up with such a great idea?” and, most important “Why I’m never where these actions happen?”.

So here is the Bud Light ad and some of my favorite experiential campaigns. A Top10 I hope you enjoy as I do!

1. Up for whatever by Bud light

2. All eyes on the S4 by Samsung

3. The Candidate by Heineken

4. Champions league match by Heineken Italy

5. The Stresstest by Nivea

6. Bikers in cinema by Carlsberg

7. Friendship test by Carlsberg

8. Unlock the 007 in you by Coca Cola

9. Taste experiment by Coca Cola

10. LG So real it’s scary – interview

Leaving technology aside

Posted by Andrea Riera on November 13, 2014  |   No Comments »

Walking into a restaurant and seeing people more focused on their mobile than on their partners is becoming a more and more usual scenario. However, it is still really frowned upon. I myself complain about this behaviour all the time.

Last weekend one of my friends came to Edinburgh to visit me after 8 months without seeing each other. It was frustrating to see how, during our meals and while exploring the city, she seemed to be more interested in her mobile than our conversations, whether it was to check her email or to see how many ‘likes’ the photo she just posted had.  I actually had to scold her more than once, tired of being seated in the restaurant looking at the walls. Really, I have to tell an adult how rude it is to behave like that?

I’m not going to lie to you or myself, I couldn’t live without technology. I live in a foreign country (I’m from Barcelona) and I can’t imagine how it would be to not call my family and friends via Skype, buy flights on the internet to visit them, access my Spotify list while flying and, once in the airport, write to my sister by Whatsapp to know where exactly she is waiting for me instead of looking for her among the crowd like if Waldo was her name.

But even if technology makes our life easy, we shouldn’t dedicate more time to our devices than our own family and friends.

Obviously I am not the first to point that out. Many sociologists and doctors have warned about the social, mental and even physical risks from our attachment to technology.  One of these problems is, of course, the addiction to our mobiles (aka nomophobia).  However, there are many who are trying to save the society from this problem.

This year the Minister of Education, Culture, Technology and Science of Japan started a new project to help solve this kind of addiction. In order to keep youth away from computers and mobiles, they created an 8 day camp for young people where it was completely forbidden to have access to any of these devices.  As a result, the study concluded that the participants weren’t first interacting with the rest of the group or the psychologists but at the end they all were really social and extroverted.

Actually, there are a lot people who need to be in constant contact with their electronic devices. Having the phone in their hands or sleeping with it under the pillow is becoming a need for many. To beat the phobia of not being in actual contact with mobiles, a group of friends from the Netherlands and the United States came up with the NoPhone. The NoPhone is simply a piece of black, rectangular-shaped plastic, billed as a new way of helping managing app addiction.

Creators Van Gould, Ingmar Larsen and Ben Langeveld said the NoPhone was originally conceived after a night out socializing and, by ‘socialize’ they mean stare at their phones and occasionally look up from their screens to order another round.

Something similar happened in Brazil. The owners of a bar were tired of seeing people hanging out in their bar without not even talking. That was what made them look for a solution to end the situation: the ‘offline vase’. Thanks to this creation, the customers of the Salve Jorge Bar now can do nothing but talk to their friends.

Despite the efforts some are making to deal with our addiction to technology, others just accept this is how society now works and tries to adapt to this new situation. This is the case in the Chinese city of Chongqing. A month ago this city created a special path for people addicted to smartphones in order to protect them from falling to the floor or crash into all kinds of obstacles.

Thanks to the existence of this technology, we not only loose time we could spend with our friends, but also we miss everything that happens around us. This year Coca Cola launched this ironic campaign to denounce our bad social behaviour and to suggest a simple but an effective method to solve this problem.

We can then say, not all are advantages with technology and sometimes it can also be dangerous. Brands like Ikea and Moleskine point out how technology sometimes is less effective and more risky than paper. With these fun campaigns, these brands invite us to leave technology aside.

Moleskine has created an outdoor campaign with posters that recreate the cover of their famous notebooks highlighting the advantages of paper support.

Meanwhile, Ikea showed us the advantage of have an actual ‘bookbook’ rather than an ebook or tablet through this TV ad campaign.

So please, go! Stop reading this post now and recommend it to your friends while enjoying a drink.

Leaving technology aside

Posted by sueb on January 30, 2015  |   No Comments »

Walking into a restaurant and seeing people more focused on their mobile than on their partners is becoming a more and more usual scenario. However, it is still really frowned upon. I myself complain about this behaviour all the time.

Last weekend one of my friends came to Edinburgh to visit me after 8 months without seeing each other. It was frustrating to see how, during our meals and while exploring the city, she seemed to be more interested in her mobile than our conversations, whether it was to check her email or to see how many ‘likes’ the photo she just posted had.  I actually had to scold her more than once, tired of being seated in the restaurant looking at the walls. Really, I have to tell an adult how rude it is to behave like that?

I’m not going to lie to you or myself, I couldn’t live without technology. I live in a foreign country (I’m from Barcelona) and I can’t imagine how it would be to not call my family and friends via Skype, buy flights on the internet to visit them, access my Spotify list while flying and, once in the airport, write to my sister by Whatsapp to know where exactly she is waiting for me instead of looking for her among the crowd like if Waldo was her name.

But even if technology makes our life easy, we shouldn’t dedicate more time to our devices than our own family and friends.

Obviously I am not the first to point that out. Many sociologists and doctors have warned about the social, mental and even physical risks from our attachment to technology.  One of these problems is, of course, the addiction to our mobiles (aka nomophobia).  However, there are many who are trying to save the society from this problem.

This year the Minister of Education, Culture, Technology and Science of Japan started a new project to help solve this kind of addiction. In order to keep youth away from computers and mobiles, they created an 8 day camp for young people where it was completely forbidden to have access to any of these devices.  As a result, the study concluded that the participants weren’t first interacting with the rest of the group or the psychologists but at the end they all were really social and extroverted.

Actually, there are a lot people who need to be in constant contact with their electronic devices. Having the phone in their hands or sleeping with it under the pillow is becoming a need for many. To beat the phobia of not being in actual contact with mobiles, a group of friends from the Netherlands and the United States came up with the NoPhone. The NoPhone is simply a piece of black, rectangular-shaped plastic, billed as a new way of helping managing app addiction.

Creators Van Gould, Ingmar Larsen and Ben Langeveld said the NoPhone was originally conceived after a night out socializing and, by ‘socialize’ they mean stare at their phones and occasionally look up from their screens to order another round.

Something similar happened in Brazil. The owners of a bar were tired of seeing people hanging out in their bar without not even talking. That was what made them look for a solution to end the situation: the ‘offline vase’. Thanks to this creation, the customers of the Salve Jorge Bar now can do nothing but talk to their friends.

Despite the efforts some are making to deal with our addiction to technology, others just accept this is how society now works and tries to adapt to this new situation. This is the case in the Chinese city of Chongqing. A month ago this city created a special path for people addicted to smartphones in order to protect them from falling to the floor or crash into all kinds of obstacles.

Thanks to the existence of this technology, we not only loose time we could spend with our friends, but also we miss everything that happens around us. This year Coca Cola launched this ironic campaign to denounce our bad social behaviour and to suggest a simple but an effective method to solve this problem.

We can then say, not all are advantages with technology and sometimes it can also be dangerous. Brands like Ikea and Moleskine point out how technology sometimes is less effective and more risky than paper. With these fun campaigns, these brands invite us to leave technology aside.

Moleskine has created an outdoor campaign with posters that recreate the cover of their famous notebooks highlighting the advantages of paper support.

Meanwhile, Ikea showed us the advantage of have an actual ‘bookbook’ rather than an ebook or tablet through this TV ad campaign.

So please, go! Stop reading this post now and recommend it to your friends while enjoying a drink.

Leaving technology aside

Posted by Andrea Riera on November 13, 2014  |   No Comments »

Walking into a restaurant and seeing people more focused on their mobile than on their partners is becoming a more and more usual scenario. However, it is still really frowned upon. I myself complain about this behaviour all the time.

Last weekend one of my friends came to Edinburgh to visit me after 8 months without seeing each other. It was frustrating to see how, during our meals and while exploring the city, she seemed to be more interested in her mobile than our conversations, whether it was to check her email or to see how many ‘likes’ the photo she just posted had. I actually had to scold her more than once, tired of being seated in the restaurant looking at the walls. Really, I have to tell an adult how rude it is to behave like that?

I’m not going to lie to you or myself, I couldn’t live without technology. I live in a foreign country (I’m from Barcelona) and I can’t imagine how it would be to not call my family and friends via Skype, buy flights on the internet to visit them, access my Spotify list while flying and, once in the airport, write to my sister by Whatsapp to know where exactly she is waiting for me instead of looking for her among the crowd like if Waldo was her name.

But even if technology makes our life easy, we shouldn’t dedicate more time to our devices than our own family and friends.

Obviously I am not the first to point that out. Many sociologists and doctors have warned about the social, mental and even physical risks from our attachment to technology. One of these problems is, of course, the addiction to our mobiles (aka nomophobia). However, there are many who are trying to save the society from this problem.

This year the Minister of Education, Culture, Technology and Science of Japan started a new project to help solve this kind of addiction. In order to keep youth away from computers and mobiles, they created an 8 day camp for young people where it was completely forbidden to have access to any of these devices. As a result, the study concluded that the participants weren’t first interacting with the rest of the group or the psychologists but at the end they all were really social and extroverted.

Actually, there are a lot people who need to be in constant contact with their electronic devices. Having the phone in their hands or sleeping with it under the pillow is becoming a need for many. To beat the phobia of not being in actual contact with mobiles, a group of friends from the Netherlands and the United States came up with the NoPhone. The NoPhone is simply a piece of black, rectangular-shaped plastic, billed as a new way of helping managing app addiction.

Creators Van Gould, Ingmar Larsen and Ben Langeveld said the NoPhone was originally conceived after a night out socializing and, by ‘socialize’ they mean stare at their phones and occasionally look up from their screens to order another round.

Something similar happened in Brazil. The owners of a bar were tired of seeing people hanging out in their bar without not even talking. That was what made them look for a solution to end the situation: the ‘offline vase’. Thanks to this creation, the customers of the Salve Jorge Bar now can do nothing but talk to their friends.

Despite the efforts some are making to deal with our addiction to technology, others just accept this is how society now works and tries to adapt to this new situation. This is the case in the Chinese city of Chongqing. A month ago this city created a special path for people addicted to smartphones in order to protect them from falling to the floor or crash into all kinds of obstacles.

Thanks to the existence of this technology, we not only loose time we could spend with our friends, but also we miss everything that happens around us. This year Coca Cola launched this ironic campaign to denounce our bad social behaviour and to suggest a simple but an effective method to solve this problem.

We can then say, not all are advantages with technology and sometimes it can also be dangerous. Brands like Ikea and Moleskine point out how technology sometimes is less effective and more risky than paper. With these fun campaigns, these brands invite us to leave technology aside.

Moleskine has created an outdoor campaign with posters that recreate the cover of their famous notebooks highlighting the advantages of paper support.


Meanwhile, Ikea showed us the advantage of have an actual ‘bookbook’ rather than an ebook or tablet through this TV ad campaign.

So please, go! Stop reading this post now and recommend it to your friends while enjoying a drink.

Once again Halloween

Posted by Andrea Riera on October 31, 2014  |   No Comments »

Here it is! Once again Halloween, the most horrific day of the year is back. Fortunately, this British festivity has been extended to other countries, which means that not only national but also international brands have launched special campaigns to join the celebration.

At Family we have selected our favourite Halloween ads of the year. From Singapore to Spain, this is our ‘not that scary’ top 5.

1. IKEA

This may be the best Halloween ad of 2014. IKEA Singapore pays tribute to ‘Shining’ with this terrific ad.

2. CREST

We couldn’t imagine a Halloween without candies. In this campaign, Crest studies the side effects candies have on children and it’s great.

3. GEICO

Fact. The characters of horror movies always take poor decisions that lead them to death. Geico parodies this movie and invite us to not make the same stupid mistakes when choosing a car insurance.

4. HOLALUZ

HolaLuz, a Spanish Energy company, has created a fake horror movie trailer, ‘The Ring-ring’ to let us know that changing our energy company shouldn’t be that scary.

5. SNICKERS

‘You don’t look yourself when you are hungry’. Luckily that’s nothing Snickers can’t fix.

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Posted by sueb on November 13, 2014  |   No Comments »

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Posted by sueb on November 13, 2014  |   No Comments »
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