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Anyone want to buy an awful photo?

Posted by Kevin Bird on August 21, 2014  |   No Comments »

This is the new Mercedes GLA
Or to be more accurate, a photograph of the brand spanking new, Mercedes GLA.
This image is featured in a new glossy, admittedly very expensive, International press and poster campaign.

Now, to be clear, I am not a massive fan of Mercedes cars.
They’re a bit like BMW’s and Audi’s to me.
There seems to be loads of different makes and models that unfortunately, and ironically, all seem to look exactly the same.
Apart from a few shiny chrome letters or numbers on the rear of the car of course.
I also don’t have to tell you, that they are very expensive cars, and have a fuel gauge that seems to go from full to empty in approximately 4.5 seconds.
So to me, and as they say on Dragons Den……..”Sorry, but I’m out”

But then a few weeks ago, whilst driving around Edinburgh in my much more fuel efficient, but not that masculine, Renault Captur,
I drove past a huge, magnificent looking 96 sheet poster featuring this shot, of the Mercedes GLA.

Now I would be exaggerating if I said I nearly crashed the car, when I saw the poster, but there was actually a slight swerve and a fumbling down the gears as my head flicked back and forwards between the road and this glorious image.

‘Wow!! How sexy is that? What is that? What make is that? Is that a Mercedes? How sexy is that……!!??

Was this, a couple of weeks after my 50th birthday, my mid life crisis kicking in?
I’ve never been that into cars. Not like some blokes are.
So why, suddenly, was this particular car poster, making me lose concentration on the road?

Then it dawned on me. I broke out in a wry smile.
This is my job. I should know this. And I know exactly what just happened.

I spend my working life as an art director and creative, advising clients on just about everything visual.
Everything from good old fashioned posters and press in advertising and design, to websites, online content and all kinds of imagery.

To be clear. I do like illustration. But I absolutely love, all things photography.

Unfortunately for the last few years, there are two things I hear a lot.

Everybody, and I mean everybody, now knows someone that apparently does………..’a bit of photography’.
They know someone who’s…………… ‘just bought a really expensive camera’, and that………… ‘ I’m sure they could ‘take some quick snaps for us’.
He or she, has also apparently done, some ‘really nice looking shots’ and can do ‘some amazing stuff, even their phone!’
(Deep sigh)

The second thing is sometimes worse.

There always seems to be some weird and wonderful collection or ‘bank of our shots’ of images that ‘might work’.
Some $5 stock shots that someone has accumulated. Some images a supplier gave them years ago.
Some stuff that was shot in 1997 which “cost a fortune at the time”, and are completely irrelevant now……….. ‘but it would be great if we could use them’.
All this, of course, and a load stuff a friend of a friend has done for nothing, and again, ‘it would be great if we make it work’.

Now I do understand the reluctance, particularly in challenging economic times, not to spend money if you don’t have to.
Commissioning new photography can be expensive. But not always.
And to be brutally honest, I’d suggest making your brand look cheap, and not getting any responses to your marketing, could be much more expensive.

I’m not saying I can’t make a clients existing photography work. I have done this many times and very successfully.
To me though, you always run the risk.
What does using a ramshackle bunch of half baked, not quite right, cheap-looking, inconsistent stock shots say about your company/brand?
Yeah….not great.

Now, what if you created something that not only looks amazing but has a consistent ‘your brand’ look and feel about it?
Create a set of images that are for you, and the job in hand. Not something just to conveniently fill a space.
And most important of all, create something that will MAKE people look at your brand. Like your brand. And engage with your brand

I increasingly see more and more imagery everywhere, that is scandalously bad.
They are so clearly stock shots.  Bog standard, space filling shots. Something that was clearly, not shot by a professional, or certainly by anyone that is, by the looks of it, any good.
Theses shots could be for any brand. That is why they are called ‘stockshots’!
Some of the car ads I’ve seen recently are quite horrendous. Horrible cut outs on horrible gaudy backgrounds.
More often than not, you can see how some poor retoucher has had to spend hours, maybe days, trying to make some p*** poor, appallingly lit photograph, look vaguely acceptable.
Is that REALLY how people want their brand to be seen?

Unsurprisingly, I can’t actually remember a lot of these brands by name.
And I would suggest that the highly informed, highly promiscuous, highly critical consumers of today, won’t remember these brands either.

So this brings us back quite nicely to our head turning Mercedes poster.

Mercedes clearly invested in their brand, by commissioning a brilliant photographer to do, what I think, is an amazing shot.
And now, a 50 year old man who was never likely to be interested in a Mercedes GLA, is interested , and even writing a blog, about a Mercedes GLA.

If only I could afford a Mercedes GLA.
(Deep sigh)

Glasgow Magic

Posted by John McDougall on August 29, 2014  |   No Comments »

This year my summer holidays were spent in Glasgow. Not the furthest I’ve travelled with my family but in terms of a fantastic holiday, few previous ones can compete. The accommodation was agreeable, though slightly unsettling – its very strange to spend 10 nights in the bedroom where you grew up, having left it over a quarter of a century ago.

If you haven’t guessed by now, we spent 11 wonderful days at the Commonwealth Games staying with my mum and dad. We are big sports fans in our family, with athletics, swimming and cycling playing a central role in our lives over the past decade or so.  And having failed to get a single ticket for London 2012, we approached Glasgow 2014 with a broad strategy to get tickets for as many days as possible.

We are all very used to Edinburgh during the Festival, with the huge number of visitors and general ‘buzz’ around the city. We’ve also been at numerous one-off events in Glasgow over the years, but nothing close to the sheer scale of the Commie Games. Venues all over the city were full to capacity; Hampden Park was filled a dozen times in a week. The Hydro hosted some sensational, world-class gymnastics and then just about had its roof blown off by the crowds at the boxing finals. The swimmers at Tollcross were visibly moved by the huge support and the velodrome crowd roared their support.

We didn’t make it to the rugby sevens at Ibrox but everyone that I’ve spoken to about it was knocked out by the atmosphere. Loads of middle class rugby fans having the time of their lives at one of football’s most famous venues, in Govan – who’d have expected that? Another one we missed was the netball – a very gruff soldier from Yorkshire, who was controlling the security at the Hydro, told us all about it. He was clearly taken aback by how exciting it was, he’d never seen netball in his life.

Glasgow embraced it all, and got involved in it all. That’s where it differed from the Festival. The percentage of the crowds from the home city was notably high, Glasgow accents were everywhere. But they weren’t a partisan support, they cheered everyone. And there were plenty of St George’s flags on show as Team England won medals everywhere. Visitors came from across the world, in much smaller numbers of course. We chatted with a lovely Australian couple at the triathlon, who were complaining about the heat! No-one expected to get sunburnt in Strathclyde Park. And the family from South Africa who were behind us on the final night of athletics remarked that the rainstorms battering Hampden that night were truly African in intensity.

It wasn’t just at the venues where Glasgow turned out in huge numbers. The City Centre was heaving with families looking for some entertainment and a chance to just be a part of it. Many had no tickets nor any intentions of attending any of the sporting sessions, they just wanted to soak up the atmosphere.

Finally, with my advertising hat on, what about the brands – the sponsors who put their money into such events. Virgin Media seemed to be making the biggest effort around the Games, their mainstream advertising was appropriate and well placed. They also had the best piece of ambient branding, as the remote controlled toy minivans which were used to retrieve discusses and javelins were all branded with Virgin Media. SSE and Emirates were already headline sponsors at some of the venues that were being used and they targeted those venues fairly effectively – SSE conducting significant client entertainment right beside their venue. Longines focussed their messaging around timing devices at the various arenas and Ford had very overt branding on the official vehicles that they had provided. The marketing teams at the big sponsors had worked at making their brands a part of the event, not just a bolt-on.

An independent view

Posted by David Isaac on August 7, 2014  |   No Comments »

Someone called me the other day from the trade magazine ‘Campaign’ and asked if I could review some of the communications coming out of the Yes and No camps. It got me thinking. So where do I stand on independence? And, do I make my thoughts public? (And why should anyone care what I thought?)

There has been a lot of spite and childish bullying on the social networks from passionate supporters of Yes and No. A lot from people in our industry. A lot from people whose opinions I respected. But I don’t now.

So it was with trepidation that I write this and give an insight into my thoughts. It’s fairly simplistic but I make no apologies for it. It’s what we do as ‘creatives’. We absorb a lot of complex stuff and come out with simple conclusions. (For example, when working on a political campaign it should revolve around three key words about the party.)

I’m undecided about the referendum; typical of me being a Libran and taking an age in weighing up both sides of the argument. (Not that I’m really into all that Mystic Meg stuff.)

I looked at the financial argument. For me, both sides have failed to convince me of the financial benefits of Yes or No. “We could be this, we could be that, we’d lose this, gain that…” It all blurs into one fuzzy financial haze. And to be honest, I don’t know who to believe.

My own view on the financial argument is that whatever Scotland decides it’ll be mess in the short term. However, in the long term I believe an independent Scotland would eventually be able to make its own way in the world. The only possible alarm bell would be if there was another global banking crisis or similar – an independent Scotland would not have the resources of the UK to bail it out.

As for the oil debate? Again, I don’t know who to believe. Is Scotland running out of oil, who gets what? Who takes on the decommissioning costs if or when the oil runs out? etc. I’ve struck oil from my thinking.

Europe brings its own contradictions. Scotland wants to be an independent country but still part of the European Union. I get the feeling Alex Salmond et al want to feel connected to something – just not the UK. The trouble with joining the all-controlling, all-too powerful European Parliament is that it comes at a price. You’d lose the independent control you have strived for in the first place. And you’d lose a lot of money being a member. It costs the UK £55 million every single day to be part of the EU. Call it £10m a day (bargain) for Scotland and that’s £3.65 billion a year. For what? Less powers, more rules and regulations from Brussels. (Scotland’s fishing industry has been particularly hit by EU regulations.)

A better solution, it seems, is that Scotland should be part of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA). This is where you can still trade with Europe but are not politically aligned/controlled by it. Norway, Lichtenstein, Switzerland and Iceland (country not store) seem to be doing perfectly well out of the agreement. Granted, Iceland is still recovering from the banking crisis but that had little to do with the EFTA.

The EFTA is something the UK will strongly consider, with or without Scotland, if a national referendum decides that the UK should leave the EU – should the Tories remain in power after the next general election. Labour’s stance is unclear but what is clear is that Ed Miliband should not eat a bacon sandwich in public. Moving on.

Then there’s the question of Scotland’s defence. Now, this is simplistic and doesn’t cover the impact of MOD jobs etc. I’m coming at it from a security point of view and asking whether Scotland would be seen as a more neutral peace-loving country like Switzerland if it were independent – and therefore less likely vulnerable to attack (from whoever nowadays)? Or does being part of the Union align us to Westminster and make us more of a target? Or will an independent Scotland that is part of Europe still be bracketed as the nasty ‘West’?

For me, my decision on independence won’t be based on the tangibles. Because quite frankly there aren’t any, they’re anybody’s guess. If it’s a Yes vote, who knows what will happen to the cost of living, taxes etc. And if it’s a No vote, Devo Max will kick in and Scotland will get new powers anyway when the Scotland Act comes into play in 2016.

So my thoughts moved onto the emotional argument – my values, what I believe in.

Unfortunately I have a coalition of values, they are cross-party. I believe in a fair society but I also believe in the entrepreneurial spirit and being rewarded for your individual endeavours.

It’s difficult for any single party to align with what I believe in. For example, however well intentioned the SNP’s free prescription charges were I thought they were little more than a statement/show-off policy – look at what we can do. It was a blatant vote buyer. I am lucky enough to be able to afford to pay prescription charges so why can’t I? The money could be put to good use elsewhere.

Tax, although irksome, could be aligned more in favour of those who work hard but have little to show for it in their pay packet.

And as one of the owners of a small business, I’d like help with tax as I run a business that employs people who contribute to Scotland’s economy etc.

The only thing I am absolutely positive about in this referendum is that it’s actually not about me; it is about my children. And I’m voting on their behalf.

Whichever way the vote goes, it is going to be messy for the first 20 years or so. By then I’ll be some doddery old fool, hacking my way around a golf course, if I’m lucky. Whereas my children, and their children, will be trying to make their way in a new Scotland. Just as much as Scotland will be trying to make its way in the world.

I’ve never been convinced by Westminster’s reasons for wanting to hang on to Scotland. The tradition argument, I just don’t buy. In my heart, I believe Scotland should be set free to make its own way in the world. But I seriously question the Scottish Government’s ability. Trading in Scotland as a small business has been nigh on impossible over the last few years with ever-decreasing budgets – the majority of our work now comes from outside Scotland. The Scottish Government couldn’t build a parliament building without going ridiculously over budget. And the Edinburgh tram system (now a single tram line) was a complete farce. Talking of which – the opening ceremony at the Commonwealth Games. (Ironically, the crowds at the Games, Scotland’s showpiece event, have shown a tremendous amount of unity amongst the home nations.)

However, with practice – and more cock ups – the Scottish Government, whoever it may consist of in the future, may eventually get it right. Only time will tell.

So this is where I’m at. With the Yes vote there is no Plan B, no turning back. It’s a risk. But I’ve always been a risk taker – you have to take risks to progress. When I left a secure job to set up Yellow M, then family, was a risk.

But back then, I didn’t have children to consider.

Win a whisky sauce gift pack, courtesy of family.

Posted by family on December 17, 2013  |   18 Comments »

It’s Christmas! And this year, we’ve been very well behaved; we’ve created the branding, packaging, point of sale, and shiny new website for The Whisky Sauce Co.

To celebrate the launch, we’re giving away a scrumptious pack of sweet whisky sauces to one lucky winner.
All you need to do, to be in with a chance of winning, is to leave a comment on this post by Wednesday 18th December telling us what your favourite Christmas food is. The winner will be announced at 5pm on Wednesday 18th December.

We wish you all a very Merry Christmas, filled with fun, festivities and (best of all) family.

Is the Internet taking over our lives?

Posted by family on November 27, 2013  |   No Comments »

Amanda Jones, Student at the University of Strathclyde & Intern at Family.
Is the internet taking over our livesOkay, perhaps that is overdramatic – as far as I’m aware there is not an army of impersonating computers on the loose though I can’t help but wonder whether the world could cope without the Internet.

I love the Internet, I really do. To set the scene, on a particularly lazy night it would not be unheard of for me to check my bank balance online (sob), check what’s on the TV online (why don’t I just check the TV guide?!), order a pizza online, and then sate my appetite for clothing by buying things, you guessed it, ONLINE! When I get lost (sadly a situation I find myself in far too often) I don’t pull out a map, I turn to my dear friend Google. I could not live my life without this invention and I am not in a minority.

A result of the Internet is that the world has now become a global community, which is great for staying in contact with friends abroad. It is genuinely easier for me to message my friend in South Africa than getting hold of my socialite Nonna who lives 10 minutes away. She is constantly talking to her friends but, unbelievably, not through tweets or Facebook messages: she actually meets her friends… in person… to talk to them. Even more amazing, when they are playing cards there are no interruptions with phone calls, WhatsApp’s or, worst of all, high importance emails. It genuinely perplexes me that with people’s schedules becoming increasingly hectic it is near impossible to organise a non-work meeting, but when the girls eventually do catch up there is more “I’d better answer this/reply to this” than actual face-to-face interaction.

We are constantly speaking but never actually talking. Our society has never been more connected but, at the same time, people have never been more isolated. It is possible to live your life without ever stepping out of the house. Watching a new movie used to involve meeting friends, getting popcorn, buying a ticket and so much excitement. Now in reality I find myself not being able to wait for a film to be released in the UK – watching it online, by myself. Admittedly, I still enjoy the film, though I do wonder if great directors such as Tarantino expected their masterpiece to be viewed, these days most likely, in a dark bedroom, on a laptop where the sound doesn’t work properly because you spilt a gin and tonic on it last week.

Maybe it’s just me but I do wonder if what was once a life enriching technology has become a shackle that weighs society down. We spend on average 3.6 hours a day using social media. There are even detox programmes available to escape from technology. Whilst I don’t suggest this, I can say going for a walk or turning your phone off for an hour is liberating. The Internet has become an essential facet of our daily life, I just hope that social media does not actually replace our social life. Perhaps I am 20 going on 70 but it is worth remembering that receiving a hug from an old friend feels ten times better than a retweet.

A Cover Up

Posted by family on August 20, 2013  |   No Comments »

I was surprised to see that The Co-operative have recently announced that they intend to cover up ‘lads mags’ such as Nuts and Zoo. The announcement follows a campaign from UK Feminista and others, leaving the likes of Loaded, Nuts and Zoo needing to implement the changes by 9th September. It has led to healthy debate on the subject and Nuts have displayed outrage at the new ruling.

Top Shelf MagazinesNuts are right to be concerned. The covering up of the main sales draw could be disastrous for the magazine. Magazines are essentially impulse purchases, and drawing consumers in with a shiny cover and a few eye-catching headlines is key.

There are other worries surrounding the sector, recent studies that have claimed that the rise in smartphones is damaging magazine sales. More consumers than ever are browsing through the internet on their smartphones instead of flicking through a magazine whilst queuing. The move towards self-checkouts has also seen declines in the purchase of impulse goods in the US, something that will no doubt spread though the UK with the proliferation of the self-checkout.

So Nuts have decided to fight back against the Co-op’s ruling that ‘lads’ mags must come in modesty bags within 6 weeks or be removed from sale in their stores. They have launched a sharable image which labels the ruling as ‘blatant censorship’, a phrase that has done it’s job in triggering high emotions on twitter (#KeepTheLadsMags). A number of supporters are also pointing out that women’s celebrity, fashion and health magazines all use images of women in bikinis, or less, on their covers and are not subject to the new rules.

It doesn’t seem like Nuts is going to win this one, however there is something to be said about the glossy black modesty covers employed by The Cooperative. Ironically they seem to stand out more, and suggest far worse than the images that are probably concealed beneath…

Family Favourites: Our Top 5 of the Fringe.

Posted by family on August 20, 2013  |   No Comments »

It’s that time of year again in Edinburgh. The sun is shining (sporadically), the locals are careering about in defiance of the slow-paced, pavement-hogging tourists, and the thespians, musicians, artists and all manner of bizarre human beings are congregating, en masse, along a particularly spectacular Royal Mile. Aside from an influx of individuals dressed as mythological creatures, the Fringe attracts a vast variety of creative talent – culminating in the world’s largest arts festival.

We’ve handpicked the crème de la crème of all things weird and wonderful for you to watch in the last remaining weeks of Fringe festivities.

BiancoBianco https://www.edfringe.com/whats-on/dance-and-physical-theatre/bianco

Time: 14.30, 20.00

Venue: NoFit State Big Top

Contemporary circus combines live music, dance, stage design, text and film with traditional circus skills. Today, NoFit State is the UK’s leading large-scale contemporary circus company. Rooted in the travelling community who arrive, pitch a tent, drum up an audience, then leave with only flattened grass and a memory to prove they were ever there: this show is certainly not to be missed.

shakespeareShit-faced Shakespeare https://www.edfringe.com/whats-on/comedy/shit-faced-shakespeare

Time: 23.20

Venue: C Venues

With one utterly sobering Shakespearean play and one utterly shit-faced actor, the magnificent Bastard Productions are back for another round at the Fringe. Every night, a cast member is randomly selected to drink a hearty amount of liquor before the show. We challenge thee to stifle a giggle, as one exceedingly merry cast member brandishes a not-so-lethal light sabre, in place of a sword.

boy_with_tapeThe Boy With Tape On His Face: More Tape https://www.edfringe.com/whats-on/comedy/boywith-

tape-on-his-face-more-tape

Time: 21.40

Venue: Pleasance Courtyard

The boy is back with another spectacularly silent sell-out show. Performances on the Royal Variety, BBC Two’s ‘Comedy Proms’, ITV 1′s ‘Comedy Rocks’ and BBC Three’s ‘Live at the Fringe’ are a testament to Sam Wills’ comedic genius – quirkily packaged in this endearing Parisian mime act.

anatomyAnatomy of the Piano https://www.edfringe.com/whats-on/music/anatomy-of-the-piano

Time: 21.50

Venue: Summerhall

Within the intimate confines of a Victorian Anatomy Lecture Theatre, our narrator, Will Pickvance, begs the question: “Where exactly is the heart of the piano?”

This talented pianist, composer and entertainer will entrance you with a surreal and mesmerising meander through, what can only be described as: ‘part piano recital, part fantasy lecture’.

Phill JupiterPhill Jupitus is Porky the Poet in Zeitgeist Limbo https://www.edfringe.com/whats-on/spokenword/

phill-jupitus-is-porky-the-poet-in-zeitgeist-limbo

Time: 17.00

Venue: The Jam House

They finally caught Jeremy fucking a car” quips the QI regular during his rendition of ‘Jeremy Clarkson: Car-fucker’. Jupitus harks back to his spoken-word roots in this offbeat performance and, as part of PBH’s Free Fringe, there’s no excuse not to see it.

IKEA

Posted by family on August 20, 2013  |   No Comments »

On a slightly stressful trip to IKEA at the weekend I was resolutely underwhelmed. The food was luke warm, it takes forever to find the furniture you want in the warehouse and then when you get it home thereʼs a vital component missing to build the coveted ʻRaskʼ.

However, even though the reality sometimes doesnʼt live up to the image, IKEA remains one of my all time favourite brands. So, in a quest to find out just why the IKEA brand is so effective I had a look back over a few IKEA campaigns that have stolen the spotlight.

The Quirky Outdoor Campaign

ikea red bookcasesIn 2012, IKEA launched a brilliant experiential campaign in Australia. Bright red IKEA shelves, which were in place for just one day, offered the surfers of Bondi Beach thousands of books to choose from and the public were invited to swap one of their own books or make a donation, with money raised going to The Australian Literacy and Numeracy Foundation.

The One with the Cats

Ikea white catsIn 2010, Mother released 100 cats into the Wembley branch of the store. They then created an advert full of lots of slow motion shots of beautiful grey and white cats jumping off the furniture. The advert highlighted how comfortable IKEA products are and Ikea also released a light-hearted video showing the making of the advert. The YouTube films garnered over 4m views between them and the website was visited by 225k individuals, spending an average of 5 minutes each.

The One that IKEA didn’t know about

Created by independent ad agency Drogo5 and without IKEAʼs input, this was truly a stroke of genius. Hotmalm.com is a fake porn site, the star being the sensuous Malm bed.

Every link takes you to the IKEA website. Additional features include ‘webcams’ showing ‘Malm on Malm action’ and ‘Live Web Malms’.

www.hotmalm.com

The One with that song

kitchenIKEAʼs Kitchen advert is backed by the unbelievably catchy remake of Jona Lewie’s 1980 hit ‘You’ll Always Find Me In The Kitchen At Parties’. The advert features an eclectic mix of characters wandering around an array of unfolding IKEA kitchens and shows a perfect blend of product, setting and song.

There have been many other adverts from IKEA but they all seem to have one thing in common – they are incredibly product-centric. Whether itʼs a full kitchen or a bookcase the focus is always leading the consumer to the checkout point.

Auto Draft

Posted by family on November 1, 2012  |   No Comments »

Going for Gold – Olympic Ad Campaigns.

Posted by family on September 12, 2012  |   No Comments »

Hi I’m Lee, Family’s newest intern. After an amazing summer of sport, the highlight without a doubt being the London Olympics, I thought it would be a good idea to share a few of my thoughts on some of the recent campaigns featured throughout the games (its not like there has been a shortage to choose from either as everything from insurance to fabric freshener caught the Olympic bug).

I was very impressed by channel 4’s ‘Meet the Superhumans’ campaign as it attempted to change the public’s attitude towards the Paralympics, moving the focus from the athletes disabilities to their sporting prowess and athletic abilities. The 90 second film aimed to attract a new audience to the games with its upbeat soundtrack, provided by HipHop group Public Enemy, and inspirational footage.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuAPPeRg3Nw

As with all major events across the world the Olympic games has experienced a huge amount of ambush advertising as no one wants to miss out on the biggest sporting event in the world and the large audience it attracts. Naturally there has been a lot of controversy regarding some campaigns given the strict Olympic rules on this form of marketing. The most notable example being Nikes campaign which aimed to compete against its rival Adidas, an official sponsor of the games, and one that paid more than £700 million for the privilege. No wonder Nike managed to ruffle a few feathers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYtMkhfQfa4

Whilst many of the Olympic focused campaigns have adopted an emotional or serious tone, there are those who look to use the games for comedic purposes. One of my favourite adverts (despite only being a parody ad for entry into The Drum’s Fauxlympics contest) has to be DMS’s advert for Durex, It is definitely the wittiest Olympic themed ad I’ve seen.

Another ingenious ad, and excellent bit of reactive marketing, is Specsavers response to the flag mix up at Hampden Stadium, where the North Korean women’s football team walked off the pitch before kick off because the South Korean flag was mistakenly shown alongside the North Korean team line up. This ad was placed in the Daily Telegraph, and yes, the strap line reads ‘Should have gone to Specsavers’.

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